Curriculum

EAP Professor Greg Nemet (left) and former EAP student Rohan Rao (right). Photo from the Robert M. La Follette School of Public Affairs.

Our interdisciplinary program is open to students in nearly any UW-Madison graduate degree program. Through classes, team projects, and extracurricular opportunities, students will engage with technical, economic, political, and social factors that shape energy policy formulation and decision-making. We examine current topics in energy resources, energy market structures and practices, traditional public utilities, energy technology, energy and environmental linkages, energy and environmental policy, and energy services. The curriculum acquaints students with relevant skills, including: quantitative analysis of energy issues, technology assessment, life-cycle analysis, business analysis, and environmental quality assessment.

EAP is not available as a stand-alone graduate degree. If students want an education focused only on EAP classes, the Nelson Institute’s Environment and Resources (MS or PhD) program provides complete curriculum overlap with the EAP certificate.

ELIGIBILITY

EAP welcomes applications from students in any graduate degree program at UW-Madison that allows students to pursue a certificate or PhD minor. Students may apply to the EAP program concurrently with their graduate school application or once they have matriculated at UW-Madison. Acceptance into EAP is contingent on enrollment in a graduate degree program.

While there are no prerequisites to the program, it is recommended that EAP applicants have completed at least one college-level course in each of the following five subject areas: physical science (physics or chemistry); natural science (biology, environmental, geology or atmospheric and oceanic); economics; social sciences or humanities (besides economics); and calculus or statistics.

REQUIREMENTS (Starting Fall 2020)

Students may choose to complete either the certificate (open to Master’s and doctoral students) or the doctoral minor (only open to PhD students), but not both. If you have questions on which option is more appropriate for your situation, please contact the EAP program coordinator.

  • Certificate: 13 credits (five courses), courses may overlap with major
  • Doctoral Minor: 12 credits (four courses), courses cannot overlap with major

This is an accordion element with a series of buttons that open and close related content panels.

Introductory Course on Energy Analysis and Policy (3 credits)

Required Course:

Students in this course are introduced to the units, language and methodologies essential for analysis of energy issues. 809 also provides an opportunity to form a cohort with other EAP students, especially those who are outside of the student’s primary discipline. It is strongly recommended, though not required, that EAP students take this course before other EAP courses.

Energy Analysis (Choose 1 course - 3 credits)

Courses in the Energy Analysis category involve quantitative analysis of the technical and economic factors that shape society’s use of energy resources.

Regularly offered courses in this category (and semester typically offered):
* EB=Economics and Business, TR=Technology and Resources, HE=Health and Environment

  • A A E/​ECON 371 – Energy, Resources and Economics (Fall)EB
  • A A E/​ENVIR ST/​POP HLTH/​PUB AFFR 881 – Benefit-Cost Analysis (Fall)EB
  • AGROECOL/​AGRONOMY/​ENVIR ST 724 – Agroecosystems and Global Change (Fall)TR
  • ENVIR ST/​A A E/​ECON/​URB R PL 671 – Energy Economics (Spring)EB
  • BSE 460 – Biorefining: Energy and Products from Renewable Resources (Spring)TR
  • CBE 512 – Energy Technologies and Sustainability (Fall)TR
  • CIV ENGR/​G L E 421 – Environmental Sustainability Engineering (Fall)HE
  • CIV ENGR 639 or G L E 401 – Special Topics in Geotechnical Engineering (Topic: Wind Energy Site/Design) (Occasionally)TR
  • E C E 356 – Electric Power Processing for Alternative Energy Systems (Fall)TR
  • E C E 427 – Electric Power Systems (Fall)TR
  • ENVIR ST/​BSE 367 – Renewable Energy Systems (Fall, Spring, Summer)TR
  • GEOSCI/​ENVIR ST 411 – Energy Resources (Fall, Summer)TR
  • M E 466 or CIV ENGR 423 – Air Pollution Effects, Measurements and Control (Spring)HE
  • M E 469 – Internal Combustion Engines (Fall)TR
  • M E/​CBE 567 – Solar Energy Technology (Fall)TR
  • N E 571 – Economic and Environmental Aspects of Nuclear Energy (Spring)TR

Other courses may qualify. See Course Offerings below for lists of approved courses from the most recent semesters.

Energy Policy (Choose 1 course - 3 credits)

Courses in the Energy Policy category involve the social, political, and environmental factors that underlie decision-making around energy choices.

Regularly offered courses in this category (and semester typically offered):
* P=Policy, HE=Health and Environment

  • ENVIR ST 349 – Climate Change Governance (Fall)P
  • ENVIR ST/​ATM OCN 355 – Introduction to Air Quality (Fall)HE
  • ENVIR ST/​ECON/​POLI SCI/​URB R PL 449 – Government and Natural Resources (Summer)P
  • ENVIR ST/​POP HLTH 471 – Introduction to Environmental Health (Spring)HE
  • ENVIR ST/​POP HLTH 502 – Air Pollution and Human Health (Fall)HE
  • ENVIR ST/​POP HLTH 560 – Health Impact Assessment of Global Environmental Change (Fall)HE
  • ENVIR ST/​POLI SCI/​PUB AFFR 866 – Global Environmental Governance (Spring)P
  • LAW 848 – Introduction to Environmental Law (Occasionally)P
  • POP HLTH/​M&ENVTOX 789 – Principles of Environmental Health: A Systems Thinking Approach (Spring)HE

Other courses may qualify. See Course Offerings below for lists of approved courses from the most recent semesters.

Capstone (3 credits)

Required Course:

Under the supervision of an EAP Faculty mentor, EAP students form teams and choose an energy-related project meeting the following criteria:

  1. There must be a “real-life” client (e.g. a non-profit organization, company, or public institution)
  2. The quality of the analysis satisfies the supervising faculty member
  3. The students present their analysis to this client

Learn more details and see past capstone summaries here.

EAP Program Seminar (1 credit - Required for Certificate; Optional for PhD Minor)

The goal of this seminar is to bring together EAP students, faculty, and industry professionals to discuss professional skills in energy analysis and policy and facilitate networking between students and industry.

REQUIREMENTS (through Summer 2020)

Students who have declared EAP before Fall 2020 can choose to complete the certificate under the requirements prior to Fall 2020 or under the requirements starting in Fall 2020. Under the prior requirements, students must complete six courses (18 credits) including:

This is an accordion element with a series of buttons that open and close related content panels.

Introductory Course on Energy Analysis and Policy (3 credits)

Required Course:

Students in this course are introduced to the units, language and methodologies essential for analysis of energy issues. 809 also provides an opportunity to form a cohort with other EAP students, especially those who are outside of the student’s primary discipline. It is strongly recommended, though not required, that EAP students take this course before other EAP courses. 

Energy Policy (Choose 1 course - 3 credits)

Regularly offered courses in this category:

Other courses may qualify. See Course Offerings below for lists of approved courses from the most recent semesters.

Energy Economics & Business (Choose 1 course - 3 credits)

Regularly offered courses in this category:

Other courses may qualify. See Course Offerings below for lists of approved courses from the most recent semesters.

Energy Technology and Resources (Choose 1 course - 3 credits)

Regularly offered courses in this category:

Other courses may qualify. See Course Offerings below for lists of approved courses from the most recent semesters.

Energy and Environment (Choose 1 course - 3 credits)

Regularly offered courses in this category:

Other courses may qualify. See Course Offerings below for lists of approved courses from the most recent semesters.

Capstone Seminar (3 credits)

Required Course:

Under the supervision of an EAP Faculty member, EAP students form teams and choose an energy-related project meeting the following criteria:

  1. There must be a “real-life” client (e.g. a non-profit organization, company, or public institution)
  2. The quality of the analysis satisfies the supervising faculty member
  3. The students present their analysis to this client

Learn more details and see past capstone summaries here.

Optional: EAP Program Seminar

The goal of this seminar is to bring together EAP students, faculty, and industry professionals to discuss professional skills in energy analysis and policy and facilitate networking between students and industry.

COURSE OFFERINGS

A variety of faculty across the UW-Madison campus teach classes that can be used to satisfy EAP requirements. Because the scheduling of these classes is coordinated with the needs of their home departments, EAP cannot guarantee that specific classes will always be offered at specific times or rotations. However, there is a list of pre-approved classes that have been offered at a level of regularity. Each semester the EAP Academic Coordinator distributes (via the EAP listserv and on this webpage) a list of specific course offerings for the upcoming semester.

SATISFACTORY PROGRESS

EAP students are expected to develop a study plan during their first semester, indicating which courses they expect to take. Students must maintain a grade-point average of at least 3.0 in their EAP courses, with a minimum grade of BC in any one course.

Click here to apply. For more information, contact program coordinator Scott Williams.

Students accepted into the program should receive email notification within 3 weeks of the receipt of their completed application. Upon acceptance, new EAP students will be added to the EAP listserv. The listserv is the primary vehicle for communications among members of the EAP community: students, faculty and staff.

 

 

 

The EAP program is part of the Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies, partnered with the Wisconsin Energy Institute